Scope Mount Tips

Read these 9 Scope Mount Tips tips to make your life smarter, better, faster and wiser. Each tip is approved by our Editors and created by expert writers so great we call them Gurus. LifeTips is the place to go when you need to know about Hunting Scopes tips and hundreds of other topics.

Scope Mount Tips has been rated 3.4 out of 5 based on 636 ratings and 4 user reviews.
How do I install the base?

Base Installing Basics

If you are using two-piece bases, there is a front and rear and they are not usually interchangeable. If you have a Ruger rifle, the bases are machined right into the receiver and you can skip down to scope mounting. A few manufacturers recommend that you torque the screws to an inch pound setting, but normally all you need do is make them tight. Be careful not to over tighten them because you can strip those teeny screws, especially if they are aluminum.

*I prefer to use blue Loctite on the threads. Use the BLUE thread locker, not the other colors. Use the red, green or (eek!) black loctite and you will probably have to drill out the screws next time. Expensive and messy!

   
How do I install scope rings?

Ring Rules

Install the rings:.

• Do not put the rings on the scope and use the scope as a wrench—this can damage the scope. Either use a proper tool or the tool provided by the manufacturer of the rings for that purpose.

• Next, especially if you are using two-piece bases, you have to make sure the rings are true and parallel. They do make precision expensive tools, but you could make do by installing the bottom of the rings and then setting the scope in them. You should be able to see if the rings are true and parallel and then adjust them. If the rings are cocked, or not parallel, when you tighten the rings you will kink the scope tube and damage the scope.

• Now, install the scope, clamping it in the rings.

   
What about bases and rings?

Steel Rings and Bases

It pays to choose good steel bases on your rifle scope mount. One or two piece steel bases, along with steel rings, are considered best. Most shooters prefer one piece bases because they are stronger. However, if you are mounting a scope on your .22, those light aluminum rings and bases will work just fine. But you wouldn't want them for mounting that humongous 6-18 60mm moon scope on your .338. The very heavy recoil could shear those mounts right in two.

Depending on the application the aluminum rings and bases may work just fine, better the consensus seems to be that you'll be a lot better off shelling out a little more for steel rings and bases.

   
Is it difficult to mount a scope on my rimfire?

Mounting a Rimfire Scope

No not at all. Virtually every rimfire rifle made today, and even some pistols, comes pre-drilled or dovetailed for scope mounting. In fact, if I were buying a rimfire rifle, one of the criteria guiding my choice would be the rifle's scope-mounting options. Once you have selected a scope, now you can find rings and bases to mount it to your rifle. Scopes do have different diameters, and you will need to choose rings of the proper size. You will also have to select the proper height. The larger the objective, the taller the rings will have to be to clear the barrel and/or sights.

Some prefer to leave the iron sights on, some like'em off. You can get rings that allow you to see through the scope mount and use the sights. Some designs make the scope too tall in this situation. They do make bases and rings that can be removed and remounted with minimal change to the zero of the rifle.

   
How do I prepare to mount and boresight my rifle?

Prepare to Mount

Once you have your scope, base and rings you are ready to mount and bore sight the rifle. You get better results if you set the rifle upright in a rifle rest so that you can get at the top of the rifle.

On the top of the receiver, remove the little screws that plug the holes for mounting the bases. Put them in a small bag in a safe place where you won't lose them. Later, when (and if) you sell the rifle but don't want to part with your "favorite scope", you can reinstall them and everything will looks nice and neat.

   
Why doesn't my scope come with mounting hardware?

In the Hall of the Mounting Rings

Every scope requires mounting rings to secure the scope to the rifle or handgun. So, why don't they come with this necessary mounting hardware? The answer is that there are too many potential applications, each of which is unique.

There are literally hundreds of different mounting rings, each designed for fitting a particular scope to a particular make and model of rifle or handgun. So you just have to mix and match.

   
How do I boresight my scope?

Preparing to Boresight

Mount the gun in the shoulder, as you would normally fire the rifle. Keep in mind that to adjust the eye relief, the distance changes depending on which shooting position you use, standing, prone, off a bench, etc. If you see a dark ring around the edge, this means the scope is too close or too far away from the eye. Slide the scope forward or backward until the view through the scope is full and clear. The scope also has an adjustment, but do this first.

If you are mounting a scope on a heavy recoiling rifle, make sure there is enough clearance between you and the scope. Now, rotate the scope in the rings until the crosshairs are nice and level. Yes, they sell a tool to do this too, but you can do it by eye too. Hold the rifle level, and align the scope to match. Make sure the scope's windage knob is on the side and the elevation is on the top.

   
How important is a solid, well aligned mounting system?

The Importance of Being Aligned and Well-Mounted

How important is a solid foundation to a house? In essence, you could say without a solid mount, you might as well not put on a scope. If your scope moves in your mount, it will change your point of aim. If your scope is tensioned, bent, twisted, or torqued in your mount, virtually anything can change your point of aim... temperature, a slight bump, recoil, or even twisting the zoom or adjusting the objective.

If your scope mount doesn't align your scope with the direction your muzzle is pointing, your reticle adjustments will have to be pushed to outside extremes to sight in your point of aim with your point of impact. And, we wouldn't that now, would we?

   
What do I need to mounty my rifle my scope?

Mounting Your Scope

Once you have the scope of your dreams you are ready to find rings and bases to mount it to your rifle. Since scopes come in different diameters, you will need to choose proper size rings. (Duh!). You will also have to select the proper height. (Double duh!)

The larger the objective on your scope is, the taller the rings will have to be to clear the barrel and/or sights. Some shooters prefer to leave the iron sights on, some like'em off. Others are just too lazy to bother. You can get rings that allow you to see through the scope mount and use the sights. This is great in most case, but be careful: Some designs will make the scope sit too high.

*You should be aware that you can get bases and rings that can be removed and remounted with minimal change to the zero of the rifle. Only in America!

   
Not finding the advice and tips you need on this Hunting Scopes Tip Site? Request a Tip Now!


Guru Spotlight
Susan Sayour